About the photo book “THE LONDON PUB” (BOOK 12: VINTAGE BRITAIN)

The London Pub with an introduction by Pete Brown is published by Hoxton Mini Press
The London Pub with an introduction by Pete Brown is published by Hoxton Mini Press

‚The London Pub‘, 144pp, cloth spine, 196 x 156mm. Images sourced from several archives. With an introduction by Pete Brown.
Book 12 in the series ‚Vintage Britain‘
This collection of glorious vintage photographs is a celebration of London’s best boozers and the people who brought them to life. Without its pubs, London just wouldn’t be London. They are the heart (and liver) of this great city.
Book design by Friederike Huber.
ISBN: 978-1-914314-28-5; £18.95

(DEUTSCHER TEXT SIEHE UNTEN)

‚The London Pub‘ is the blunt, direct, alluring title of Volume 12 in the wonderful Vintage Britain book series from the enterprising, lovely little book-dedicated East London publishers Hoxton Minipress. Basically, I’m skeptical at first when I come across a photo book whose pictures come from the lenses of countless photographers. I’m a big advocate of the monograph, anthology photo books have a hard time with me. In particular anthology photo books, which are suspected of being able to end up in the corresponding corners of the respective souvenir shops. And an illustrated book about the London pub system is all the more difficult because pub life will always be linked to me by two illustrated books from the history of photography: Firstly, Anders Petersen’s “Café Lehmitz” from 1978 and secondly – not quite as famous – Antonia Zennaro’s “Reeperbahn” from 2013.

First of all, the cover photo immediately draws me into the subject: six London gentlemen are sitting at a bar table, with their beers and some with cigarettes, around a daily newspaper from which one of the gentlemen is obviously quoting. With a cigarette in his mouth and a cap on his head, he seems to be repeating exciting events, the other gentlemen have turned their heads with interest. Several age groups are represented, most of them wear a suit and tie. It seems to be the last page of the relevant daily newspaper that they are engrossed in – maybe the page about „Miscellaneous“, or“Society“?

The reviewer took the bait, the cover is exciting enough. Narrative, cinematic – and synesthetic: I smell the cigarette smoke, taste the beer, hear the chatter of the pub visitors. Next acid test: I don’t want to have photo books anymore that don’t properly introduce what they show with a great, exciting text. I recently had an incredibly great photo book in my hands, but it was limited to 123 words of text, I counted it, it was in font size 70 or so, so that it was not so obvious how little text it was. Completely helpless, I wandered through what was actually a great book and I had to guess who photographed someone and why. Well, „The London Pub“ includes a formidable, knowledgeable pub foreword by British drinking culture specialist and winner of countless drinking book awards Pete Brown („Man Walks Into Pub“, 2003; „The Pub: A Cultural Institution from Country Inns to Craft Beer Bars and Corner Locals”, 2016). „Well into the 20th century, most working-class Londoners lived in warren-like slums, and drank in homely, cozy alehouses,“ analyzes Brown. And further: “From the middle of the 19th century, ambitious landlords built grander, more ornate premises that became known as ‘gin palaces’. The disapproval of these places by the upper classes went well beyond fears of drunkenness.”

“The London Pub” flows like a good draft beer. The pictures are wonderfully chosen and selected, thematically meaningfully coordinated, built up with the dramaturgy of an extensive pub evening. „Bartenders at The George. London, 1962” is the name of the first picture, the prelude, before the introductory text. Some of the protagonists are introduced, it is the only photo in which the people are posing. There are eight bartenders, six women, two men who have lined up behind the bar for the photo. The opening credits, if we want to translate it into cinematography.

P4, Bartenders at The George, London 1962 (Getty Images)
P4, Bartenders at The George, London 1962 (Getty Images)
P9, The Baptist’s Head (now closed) on St Johns Lane. Clerkenwell, 1954. (Alamy)

Then it starts, into the plot of the book, beginning with the preparation: day, in front of the pub, barrel delivery. „Fresh casks of beer are delivered first thing and dropped straight into the cellar from the pavement. Murphy’s Free House. London, c.1960” is the title of one of the picture in question. A few dozen kegs are waiting for delivery outside an Irish pub. A girl and a boy watch the spectacle from the edge with interest.

A few architectural photos follow, pubs from the outside – peace and quiet. And then we dive into life. Beer, cigarette smoke, light falling through the pub window. People talking, people laughing, alone, in pairs, in groups, having serious conversations. And above all drinking. Morning, noon, afternoon. We meet a young man, with a glass and fag in his right hand, laughing at the camera, with a mischievous look, I almost missed, oh shame, that it is the first prominent pub-goer who appears in the book: the actor Albert Finney, „at a pub behind the Cambridge Theatre. Covent Garden”, in 1961. Finney is in his mid-twenties, already a well-known theatre actor in London. 1961 was the year he turned down the lead in David Lean’s Lawrence of Arabia – making Peter O’Toole a world star.

We are now in the middle of pub life, naturally one of the strongest parts of the book. It’s also fascinating how the captions sometimes contain short anecdotes: „The Blind Beggar on Whitechapel Road, where Ronnie Kray infamously shot a rival. East End, 1969“. Ronnie Kray, along with his brother Reggie Kray, were big names in organized crime in east London, particularly in the 1950s. In the 1960s they were socially recognized nightclub owners of „Swinging London“.

P19, Lunch hour session in the Globe public house at Borough Market near Southwark Cathedral. The people around the table work at the railway approach London Bridge and at the Market. 2nd June 1955 (Alamy)
P19, Lunch hour session in the Globe public house at Borough Market near Southwark Cathedral. The people around the table work at the railway approach London Bridge and at the Market. 2nd June 1955 (Alamy)

We move outside for a moment, we drink and chat in front of the door, then there is an interlude with animals, cats and dogs are also part of the pub inventory. We turn to the social centre of the pub: the man behind the bar – and finally the woman behind the bar. A pint-pouring Audrey Hepburn figure is surrounded by frolicking roosters, circa 1950. That women’s singularities in the pub is changing, though soon: „When women gained financial independence, pubs began to see them as a source of custom in their own right. Lager was originally advertised specifically as a beer for women. London, 1975”. Children are also appearing more and more in the pub, and finally mothers with their babies.

P43, London pub, 1950s (Alamy)
P43, London pub, 1950s (Alamy)

The next part is devoted to the pub as a place of entertainment, as a location for games – slot machines, card games, dominoes, darts, billiards („Suzi Quatro playing snooker at The Marlborough. Soho, 1973“). With increasing alcohol consumption, the games become more exuberant and the game ideas crazier. Eventually, the television will also find its way into the pub: football broadcasts, royals, politics. There is also a close connection to the music: trumpet players, guitar, piano, sousaphone, the jukebox – and the Stones. And then there is dancing, singing and celebrating. Finally, we land in the night. Last round. The children are already waiting in front of the door for their drunken parents.

P61, Kenton Arms on Kenton Road. Hackney, 1986. (Berris Connolly)
P61, Kenton Arms on Kenton Road. Hackney, 1986. (Berris Connolly)
P68, An unknown pub. Soho, 1981. (Alamy)
P68, An unknown pub. Soho, 1981. (Alamy)

To return to the beginning: „The London Pub“ is a wonderfully coherent illustrated book, cleverly and consistently designed and edited by Friederike Huber, in the usual handy format. The restriction to monochrome increases this coherence and also allows for leaps in time within the book, from recordings from the 19th century to the most recent one from 1997, the TV broadcast of Diana’s funeral in a pub.

Back to the drinking specialist Pete Brown: „The basic function of the pub is unchanged,“ he writes. “But we visit much less often now that we have plasma screens, Netflix and Deliveroo, as well as Westfield, Starbucks and Vue. The pub now is an occasional treat, more desperate for our business. It’s louder in every sense of the word.“ Cheers.

The LondonPub with an introduction by Pete Brown is published by Hoxton Mini Press

P91, Mrs Vi Lee, landlady of the Prince and Princess of Wales (now closed), prepares for celebrations of the Royal wedding. Southwark/Walworth, 1981. (Alamy)
P91, Mrs Vi Lee, landlady of the Prince and Princess of Wales (now closed), prepares for celebrations of the Royal wedding. Southwark/Walworth, 1981. (Alamy)
P99, Outside the pub on a bank holiday. London, 1947 (Alamy)
P99, Outside the pub on a bank holiday. London, 1947 (Alamy)

##

DEUTSCHE VERSION

„The London Pub“ ist der unverblümte, direkte, vielversprechende Titel des 12. Bandes aus der wunderbaren Buchserie „Vintage Britain“ aus dem rührigen, dem schönen kleinen Buch verschriebenen Ostlondonder Verlag Hoxton Minipress. Grundsätzlich bin ich erst einmal skeptisch, wenn mir ein Fotobuch begegnet, dessen Bilder aus den Linsen unzähliger Fotografen stammen. Ich bin großer Verfechter der Monografie, Sammelbildbände haben es bei mir schwer. Insbesondere Sammelbildbände, die in den Verdacht geraten, thematisch in den entsprechenden Ecken der jeweiligen Souvenirshops landen zu können. Und ein Bildband über das Londoner Pubwesen hat es umso schwerer, als mir das Kneipenleben auf immer mit zwei Bildbänden aus der Fotografiegeschichte verbunden sind: Erstens Anders Petersens „Café Lehmitz“ aus dem Jahr 1978 und zweitens – nicht ganz so berühmt – Antonia Zennaros „Reeperbahn“ aus dem Jahr 2013.

Zunächst einmal zieht mich das Titelfoto sofort ins Thema hinein: Sechs Londoner Herren sitzen, mit ihren Bieren, teils mit Zigaretten versehen, an einem Kneipentisch, um eine Tageszeitung herum, aus der einer der Herren offensichtlich zitiert. Mit Zigarette im Mund, Käppi auf dem Kopf scheint er spannende Ereignisse wiederzugeben, die anderen Herren haben ihre Köpfe interessiert zugewandt. Mehrere Altersstufen sind vertreten, man trägt meistenteils Anzug und Krawatte. Es scheint die letzte Seite der entsprechenden Tageszeitung zu sein, in die man vertieft ist – vielleicht die Seite über „Vermischtes“, „Gesellschaft“?

Rezensent hat angebissen, das Cover ist spannend genug. Erzählerisch, filmisch – und synästhetisch: Ich rieche den Zigarettenqualm mit, schmecke das Bier, höre das Gequassel der Pubbesucher mit. Nächste Nagelprobe: Ich mag keine Bildbände mehr haben, die das, was sie zeigen, nicht ordentlich mit einem tollen, spannenden Text eingeführt haben. Neulich hatte ich einen unglaublich tollen Bildband in der Hand, der beschränkte sich auf 123 Wörter Text, ich hab’s extra gezählt, der war dann in Schriftgröße 70 oder so, damit es nicht so auffiel, wie wenig Text das war. Völlig hilflos irrte ich durch das eigentlich großartige Buch und musste raten, wer da warum irgendwen fotografiert hat. Also:  „The London Pub“ beinhaltet ein formidables, kenntnisreiches Pub-Vorwort des britischen Trinkkulturspezialisten und Preisträger zahlloser Trinkbuchauszeichnungen Pete Brown („Man Walks Into Pub“, 2003; “The Pub: A Cultural Institution from Country Inns to Craft Beer Bars and Corner Locals”, 2016). „Well into the 20th century, most working-class Londoners lived in warren-like slums, and drank in homely, cosy alehouses”, analysiert Brown. Und weiter: “From the middle of the 19th century, ambitious landlords built grander, more ornate premises that became known as ‘gin palaces’. The disapproval of these places by the upper classes went well beyond fears of drunkenness.”

“The London Pub” fließt dahin wie ein gut gezapftes Bier. Die Bilder sind wundervoll ausgesucht und selektiert, thematisch sinnreich abgestimmt, aufgebaut mit der Dramaturgie eines ausgiebigen Kneipenabends. „Bartenders at The George. London, 1962“ ist das erste Bild benannt, das Präludium, noch vor dem Einführungstext. Einige der Protagonisten werden vorgestellt, es ist das einzige Foto, das gestellt ist, in dem die Menschen posieren. Es sind acht Bartender, sechs Frauen, zwei Männer, die sich fürs Foto hinter der Bar aufgestellt haben. Der Vorspann, wenn wir es ins Kinematographische übertragen wollen. Dann geht’s los, hinein in die Handlung des Buches, beginnend mit der Vorbereitung: Tag, vorm Pub, Fassanlieferung. „Fresh casks of beer are delivered first thing and dropped straight into the cellar from the pavement. Murphy’s Free House. London, c.1960” heißt eines der betreffenden Bilder. Ein paar Dutzend Fässer stehen zur Anlieferung vor einem irischen Pub. Ein Mädchen und ein Junge schauen sich das Schauspiel vom Rand her interessiert an.

Es folgen ein paar Architekturfotos, Pubs von außen – Ruhe. Und dann tauchen wir ein, ins Leben. Bier, Zigarettenrauch, Licht das durchs Pubfenster fällt. Menschen die sich unterhalten, Menschen, die lachen, alleine, zu zweit, in Gruppen, ernste Gespräche führend. Und vor allem trinkend. Morgens, mittags, nachmittags. Wir begegnen einem jungen Mann, mit Glas und Kippe in der Rechten, in die Kamera lachend, mit verschmitztem Blick, fast hätte ich, oh Schande, übersehen, dass es der erste prominente Pubgänger ist, der im Buch auftaucht: der Schauspieler Albert Finney, „at a pub behind the Cambridge Theatre. Covent Garden“, im Jahr 1961. Finney ist da Mitte zwanzig, bereits ein in London bekannter Theaterschauspieler. 1961 war das Jahr, als er die Hauptrolle in David Leans „Lawrence von Arabien“ ablehnte – wodurch Peter O’Toole zum Weltstar wurde.

Wir sind nun mitten im Publeben, naturgemäß eine der stärksten Strecken des Buches. Spannend auch, wie die Bildunterschriften bisweilen kurze Anekdoten anreißen: „The Blind Beggar on Whitechapel Road, where Ronnie Kray infamously shot a rival. East End, 1969“. Ronnie Kray, samt seines Bruders Reggie Kray waren Größen des organisierten Verbrechens in Ostlondon vor allem in den 50ern. In den 60ern waren sie dann schon zeitweise gesellschaftlich anerkannte Nachtclubbesitzer des „Swinging London“.

Wir bewegen uns kurz nach draußen, getrunken und gequatscht wird auch mal vor der Tür, dann gibt’s ein Intermezzo mit Tieren, Katzen und Hunde gehören schließlich auch zum Kneipeninventar. Wir wenden uns dem gesellschaftlichen Zentrum des Pubs zu: dem Mann hinter der Bar – und schließlich auch der Frau hinter der Bar. Eine bierzapfende Audrey Hepburn-Figur wird von schäkernden Gockeln umringt, circa 1950. Dass Frauen Einzelerscheinungen im Pub sind, ändert sich aber bald: „When women gained financial independence, pubs began to see them as a source of custom in their own right. Lager was originally advertised specifically as a beer for women. London, 1975”. Auch Kinder tauchen immer mehr im Pub auf, schließlich auch Mütter mit ihren Babys.

P117, Singer Peggy Seeger playing at The Enterprise. Covent Garden, c.1960. (Alamy)
P117, Singer Peggy Seeger playing at The Enterprise. Covent Garden, c.1960. (Alamy)

Der nächste Part widmet sich dem Pub als Unterhaltungsort, als Lokalität für Spiele – Glücksspielautomaten, Kartenspiele, Domino, Darts, Billiard („Suzi Quatro playing snooker at The Marlborough. Soho, 1973“). Mit zunehmenden Alkoholkonsum werden die Spiele ausgelassener und die Spielideen verrückter. Schließlich nimmt auch der Fernseher Einzug in den Pub: Fußballübertragungen, Royales, Politisches. Und dann gibt es auch eine enge Verbindung zur Musik: Trompetenspieler, Gitarre, Piano, Sousaphon, die Jukebox – und die Stones. Und dann wird auch getanzt, gesungen, gefeiert. Und schließlich sind wir in der Nacht gelandet. Letzte Runde. Die Kinder warten schon vor der Tür auf ihre betrunkenen Eltern.

Um nochmal zum Anfang zurückzukommen: „The London Pub“ ist ein wundervoll geschlossener Bildband, raffiniert und konsequent von Friederike Huber designt und editiert, im gewohnt handlichen Format. Die Beschränkung aufs Monochrome steigert diese Geschlossenheit und gestattet auch die Zeitsprünge innerhalb des Buchs, von Aufnahmen aus dem 19. Jahrhundert bis hin zur jüngsten aus dem Jahr 1997, der TV-Übertragung in einem Pub von Dianas Beerdigung.

Am Ende zurück zum Trinkspezialisten Pete Brown: „The basic function of the pub is unchanged”, schreibt er. “But we visit much less often now that we have plasma screens, Netflix and Deliveroo, as well as Westfield, Starbucks and Vue. The pub now is an occasional treat, more desperate for our business. It’s louder in every sense of the word.” Prost.

P129, Private Thomas Nugent celebrates finally returning home from a POW camp in Korea. Edmonton, 1953. (Photo Bela Zola/Mirrorpix/Getty Image)
P129, Private Thomas Nugent celebrates finally returning home from a POW camp in Korea. Edmonton, 1953. (Photo Bela Zola/Mirrorpix/Getty Image)
P135, A soldier kissing a young woman in a pub during V-E Day celebrations in London, 8th May 1945. (Photo by Paul Popper/Popperfoto via Getty Images/Getty Images)
P135, A soldier kissing a young woman in a pub during V-E Day celebrations in London, 8th May 1945. (Photo by Paul Popper/Popperfoto via Getty Images/Getty Images)

Schreibe einen Kommentar

Deine E-Mail-Adresse wird nicht veröffentlicht. Erforderliche Felder sind mit * markiert